History of Chrysalis Manor

High Street in Springfield is home to many of the city’s historic sites and buildings, including the historic manor known to some as the Hauk-Pringle-Patric House. The building, which is now known as Chrysalis Manor, has had a very long, and storied history in the Springfield community. The Manor was constructed in 1877 by Charles and Mary Hauk. Charles was a wealthy businessman in Springfield, who worked in many different fields including owning a wholesale and retail grocery Store.

After its construction in 1877, the manor changed hands several times and was owned by several prominent members of the community. These owners included Thomas J. Pringle, a prominent private practice lawyer, prosecuting attorney, and Ohio State Senator. The manor was also owned by Charles E. Patric, an inventor and innovator of the milling process, and his wife, Mary Jane. Charles and Mary purchased the Manor in 1899.

In 1990, Ninety-one years after The Patric’s purchased the house, and over a century after its construction, the Manor changed hands again, and was purchased by Project Woman. This was the first step in the direction of the fulfillment of a dream: provide long-term, transitional housing for survivors of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault.

This dream began in the 1980’s, when the staff at Project Woman noticed that many of the clients who took residence in the emergency shelter eventually returned to their abuser. For years Project Woman hoped to be able to provide this type of housing, and took their first steps by purchasing the house that would one day become Chrysalis Manor. Despite owning the building since 1990, the doors of Chrysalis Manor did not open until 1996, after years of planning, and renovations. On December 24th, 1996, Christmas Eve, the first families moved in to Chrysalis Manor, and Project Woman’s dream to provide transitional housing had begun.

Learn more about the mission of Project Woman.

CrowdRise Campaign

Chrysalis Manor is much more than a house; it is a transitional housing program for survivors to begin new, living free from violence. Through intensive supports and empowerment education, survivors become independent and self-sufficient. Chrysalis Manor is dedicated as a safe space where survivors can begin the journey toward “Survivor Transformation,” and by donating though CrowdRise, your donation is doubled by a generous grant through Ohio HealthPath Foundation.

Funds raised will be used to support the Chrysalis Program in the following ways:

  • The Property: though a grant was received to renovate the property there was significant deferred maintenance over the year. Your donation will help to complete the restoration.
  • The Serenity Garden: the garden space has been designed and the initial planting is complete through the generosity of the Mental Health and Recovery Board of Clark, Madison and Greene Counties. Your donation will help with continued planting, installing a fence, mural and ongoing care to this therapeutic and healing space.
  • The Program: intensive, trauma-informed and empowerment focused services and supports for survivors are the core of the program. Your donation will provide local match funds which will leverage state and federal grants for program needs.

To learn more about this fundraiser and donate to the campaign, visit crowdrise.com/projectwoman or follow Project Woman on Facebook for updates throughout the campaign.